On Tolerance

The tension between the social justice movement and the liberal ideals of tolerance and free speech came crashing into the mainstream last week, as activists at the University of Missouri and Yale gained widespread attention for events occurring on their respective campuses. There has been a lot of coverage, so if you are not familiar with the situation, I would recommend (sorted by brevity) this video, reading Popehat’s two posts here and here, Robby Soave at Reason, Jonathan Chait in NY Magazine, and for a longer piece, Connor Friedersdorf at The Atlantic.

Having observed many events and effects of the social justice movement, I’d like to propose a way to think about the liberal value of tolerance, a value that social justice activists have generally disregarded. There are other issues with the movement’s methods, and for more on that, I would recommend some Slate Star Codex links in the first footnote (1).

Recent events have indicated that many social justice activists are not concerned about the movement’s chilling effects on free speech. I think the coverage of the events and general political sentiment recognize this is a dangerous situation, and that free speech must be defended, even for speakers with whom we disagree (2). But I’d like to submit a broader defense of tolerance, especially in light of what free speech does not defend. Randall Munroe of xkcd (3) presents the counter-thesis, essentially arguing for intolerance as long as it is allowed by law:

Use of this comic for criticism purposes qualifies as fair use under Copyright Act of 1976, 17 US Code Section 107.

Although Munroe is correct in that it is totally legal to advocate for people who you disagree with to lose their jobs, I think it is a pretty disturbing, intolerant position. But I want to better understand what tolerance means by looking at a thought exercise I call the Tolerance Gradient. Continue reading On Tolerance

Copyright versus Creativity

Unlike the cave painting above (which is no longer under copyright), you are reading an article whose copyright will expire in over a century.  Given the life expectancy of an American born less than 30 years ago, I’m likely to just miss the next Cubs World Series win in 2070.  But 70 years after I’m dead, my copyrights will expire, meaning you will be free to incorporate this article into a movie or perhaps a 3D hologram, sometime around 2140.  Of course, that assumes copyright law won’t change in the intervening 130 years.  History seems to indicate otherwise, as 130 years ago, my copyright would have only lasted 56 years, which suggests this article’s copyright might not expire until 2170, or maybe even 2200!

Continue reading Copyright versus Creativity

New Management

Hi, my name is Michael, and I bought this domain from Josh, since he’s been a bit too busy to have many updates.  The blog will continue to function similarly, providing analysis of various topics from a libertarian-ish perspective.   I have a similar approach to issues;  I think markets do a pretty good job allocating resources.  I also think the state should err on the side of letting people work out systems on their own, but I’m about pragmatic consequentialism, not rigid ideology.

Finally, please bear with me as I get the blog set up, and the formatting worked out. I’ve tried to set up the archives to keep as many backlinks as possible to Josh’s old posts. If there are any issues, definitely let me know on Twitter @postlibertarian (the Twitter account was transferred over as well) or in the comments.